Arxiu d'etiquetes: china

Lack of phosphorus puts global food security at risk

Phosphorus (P) is an indispensable element for life on Earth. Essential structures for any organism like DNA or RNA contain this element, and plants can not perform photosynthesis without it. Because of this, crops require huge amounts of phosphorus to meet the standards of efficiency and productivity needed to feed an ever-growing human population. However, this is a limiting and finite resource, and the predictions are not promising: reserves will be depleted in about 100-150 years. That will lead to significant geopolitical problems still unimaginable because, apart from the ephemeral nature of this resource, there is the fact that 90% of stocks are in the hands of only 6 countries. Conflict is served.

INTRODUCTION

Anyone who has ever had to buy fertilizer will recognize this sequence: N-P-K (nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium). They are the most used nutrients for gardening and plant production in general. Without them, plants do not grow or can not develop enough to persist in the long term. Of the three main nutrients, potassium is the most abundant in the earth’s crust (representing approximately 2.4% of the earth’s surface by weight), especially in ancient seabed and lakebeds, as well as being the most available for plants. On the other hand, nitrogen in its gaseous form is extremely abundant (78.1% of the air around us is molecular nitrogen), but not their molecules in solid form, which are usually scarce due to their high mobility throughout the soil. However, thanks to the Haber-Bosch process (which lead researchers to win the Nobel Prize in Chemistry), solid nitrogen (in the form of ammonia) was produced from gaseous nitrogen, leading to a high availability of this inorganic fertilizer.

haber_bosch_in_lab
Friz Haber (right) with a scientist who manipulates the Haber-Bosch method. This way of extracting the atmospheric nitrogen and turning it into ammonia is considered, by many scientists and historians, as the most important invention of the modern history. Without it, the world would not have been able to afford even half of the current food demand. Source: el juicio de fritz haber.

THE PHOSPHORUS CASE

Phosphorus, however, is the third party in discordance. Essential for life, it is the main component of DNA, RNA, ATP (the energy used in cellular processes) and phospholipids, which cover cell membranes. It is present in the bones and is involved in almost any animal biological process. In addition, it is imperative for plant growth: without phosphate, photosynthesis can not be carried out. The biggest problem with phosphorus is that it is not free in nature. Plants and, in general, all organisms, satisfy their phosphorus needs thanks, mainly, to another living organism: animals, from plants and, these, from animal residues or their corpses, which release the Phosphate in the decomposition process. In fact, the most important fertilizers until the arrival of inorganic fertilizers, already in the twentieth century, were the excrements and urine of farm animals, which contain a large amount of phosphorus, in addition to the other elements already mentioned. However, as a result of the Haber-Bosch invention and the increase in food demand as a result of population growth, phosphorus deposits, which are in the form of minerals and are actually scarce in the earth’s crust, began to be exploited.

100_6906
Guano accumulated on an islet of Peru. Guano, together with excrements and urine from farm animals, was an important source of phosphorus until the 20th century. This substrate, formed from continuous depositions of seabirds, seals and bats, is still very much appreciated even today, especially in organic farming. Source: Hiding in Honduras.

 

A SCARCE, IRREPLACEABLE, AND BAD-USED RESOURCE

Phosphorus is an irreplaceable and non-synthesizable resource. Reserves are finite and are being wasted, since much of the fertilizer applied is not assimilated by plants and, through the soil, ends up in the sea or in the lakes, where they unbalance the ecosystems. Being such a scarce resource, it is often the limiting resource in most ecosystems. For that reason, an overfertilization of phosphorus is often exploited by autotrophic algae to grow uncontrollably, which, in many cases, causes blooms that can generate important animal, economic and environmental losses.

mar-menor
Extension of the vegetation of the Mar Menor (Murcia) in 2014 and 2016. 85% of the vegetation has died in less than two years, due to strong phenomena of eutrophication, in which phosphorus has played a key role. The excess of nutrients allows algae proliferation, which end up causing difficulties of light infiltration which, in turn, preclude phothosynthesis, causing the death of plants. Source: El País.

6 COUNTRIES CONTROL WORLDWIDE PRODUCTION

The United States Geological Survey (USGS) has estimated the world’s reserves of phosphorus at 71 billion tonnes. 90% of these are in the hands of 6 countries: Morocco (where, according to the USGS, 75% of the world’s mineral reserves are found there), China, Algeria, Syria, South Africa and Jordan. However, United States and, specially, China (accounting for 47% of world phosphate production), are the countries that are currently extracting more phosphorus from their deposits. This production has been increasing in the last years, and it will go to more in the coming decades. According to this recent article by Nature, it will be necessary to double, by the year 2050, the use of phosphate fertilizers to meet the demand of food, in a world where there will already be 9,000 million humans. But, by then, more than half of the phosphorus in the reservoirs will have been used. This study warned of the possibility that we were reaching the peak of phosphorus production, although new calculations estimate their peak around the year 2040. In any case, if we continue with the current production, the reserves will be depleted in no more than 100 years.

phosphate-rock-reserves
World phosphate rock reserves by country. Morocco capitalizes on reserves, followed by China and Algeria. Around 90% of the world’s phosphorus reserves are found in Africa, which predicts a future in which this continent will play a very important role in the negotiations for this finite resource. Source: WRForum.

GEOPOLITICS ENTERS INTO THE SCENE

A symptom of the potential shortage of phosphorus in the not too distant future is the rise in phosphorus prices that has been observed recently due to rising demand. Between 2007 and 2008 the price of phosphate tons increased threefold from 2005 values, and cost up to 9 times more than in the 1970s. In addition, it has been estimated that by 2035 phosphorus demand will exceed supply, what will cause an increased prices and, with them, political tensions. No stranger to it, many countries are working on ensuring a supply of this valuable resource for a few more decades. China, for example, which is now the largest producer (what does not mean the holder of the largest reserves) has begun to impose 135% tariffs on its exports. The United States, on the other hand, has signed a bilateral free trade agreement with Morocco, which gives it the rights to exploit their long-term phosphate deposits. Taking into account that most of Morocco’s phosphate reserves are in Western Sahara (a region that has fought for its independence since its occupation in 1975), it is not surprising that the United States has always supported Morocco in the United Nations Security Council, vetoing any proposal in favor of the independence of Western Sahara.

a2
Rise of prices of different phosphate minerals. Prices are expected to rise in the coming decades, as phosphate deposits are depleted. Source: USDA.
cordell
Estimation of the evolution of phosphoric rock production and the moment when it will reach the peak of production. Many scientists agree that reserves will last between 60 and 130 years. Source: Cordell et al., 2009.

THE SOLUTION IS TO GO BACK TO THE ROOTS

According to the latest estimates, phosphorus deposits will be depleted, affecting crops around the world. This decline in food production will have a global repercussion, especially in the poorest countries, the most susceptible to a possible decrease in food production. Failing to establish measures to reduce global population, the lack of phosphorus combined with climate change will lead to tense relations between many countries, leading to geopolitical conflicts on a global scale.

7920453668_1a42c7b136_k
According to Metson et al. (2016) a plant-based diet would help to reduce the phosphorus demand. According to their calculations, a vegetarian person requires approximately 4 kg of phosphate rock per year, almost 3 times less than a meat-based diet, which consumes about 11.8 kg of phosphorus per year. Source: Jeremy Keith.

For that reason, the main solution is to use phosphorus in a more rational way and to recycle it as much as possible. Today, around 80% of phosphorus is lost between the exploitation of the mineral, its transport and its application in the fields, which requires us to make a more sustainable use of this resource. However, the world food security will only be able to mantain its production by recycling. The main proposal would be to return to the beginning: to collect human excrets and urine, generated in cities and towns, to recover all that phosphorus that, in other conditions, would end up in the aquatic environment. Approximately 100% of the phosphorus consumed by mankind through food is excreted in excrets and urine. Collecting it would be like a double-edged sword: on the one hand we would satisfy the phosphorus demand of the crops and, on the other hand, we would avoid the eutrofization of waters due to the excess of these nutrients. Furthermore, a change in diet, prioritizing vegetables instead of meat, would reduce the demand of phosphorus between 20 and 45%, according to Cordell et al. (2009). Other solutions include the recovering of the use of manure in more rural and less-technological areas and promoting the composting of food waste in households, factories and commercial establishments. Finally, a waste from wastewater treatment plants, called struvite (magnesium ammonium phosphate) could help to fertilize the fields in an effectively and cleanly way.

1280px-struvit_guelleaufbereitung
Struvite ore, like the one from the image, is obtained spontaneously in sewage treatment plants. Although it causes obstruction problems in the water treatment plant pipes due to its crystallization, it could be used as a clean fertilization system that would provide phosphorus, nitrogen and magnesium. Source: Creative Commons.

The madness begun at the beginning of the 20th century with the exploitation of the phosphoric rock to produce food in great quantity is almost over, and this requires us to adapt our crops and, perhaps, our way of life, to a future that will have to drink a lot of the proceedings carried out in the past. There is a need for a change of mentality, centered on a reduction of the world population and on a major sustainability of natural resources, if we really want to guarantee a world where no one is hungry.

REFERENCES

Anuncis

La falta de fósforo pone en riesgo la seguridad alimentaria mundial

El fósforo (P) es un elemento indispensable para la vida en la Tierra. Estructuras imprescindibles para cualquier ser vivo como el ADN o ARN contienen este elemento, y las plantas no pueden realizar la fotosíntesis sin él. Debido a eso, los cultivos requieren de ingentes cantidades de fósforo para cumplir los estándares de eficiencia y productividad necesarios para alimentar a una población humana que crece sin cesar. Sin embargo, éste es un recurso limitante y finito, y las predicciones no son halagüeñas: las reservas se agotarán en unos 100-150 años. Eso conllevará importantes problemas geopolíticos aún por imaginar ya que, unido a ese carácter efímero de este recurso, se suma el hecho de que el 90% de las existencias están en manos de tan sólo 5 países. El conflicto está servido.

INTRODUCCIÓN

Cualquier persona que haya tenido que comprar alguna vez fertilizante reconocerá esta secuencia: N-P-K (nitrógeno, fósforo, potasio). Son los nutrientes más utilizados para jardinería y producción vegetal en general. Sin ellos, las plantas no crecen o no logran desarrollarse lo suficiente como para persistir a largo plazo. De los tres nutrientes principales, el potasio es el más abundante en la corteza terrestre (representa aproximadamente el 2.4% de la superficie terrestre en peso) sobretodo en antiguos lechos marinos y lacustres, además de ser el más disponible para las plantas. Por otra parte, el nitrógeno, en su forma gaseosa, es extremadamente abundante (el 78.1% del aire que nos rodea es nitrógeno molecular) pero no así sus moléculas en forma sólida, que suelen ser escasas debido su alta mobilidad a través del suelo. No obstante, gracias al Proceso de Haber-Bosch (desarrollado por los investigadores que le dan el nombre, ganadores del Nobel de Química) se logró producir nitrógeno sólido (en forma de amoníaco) a partir del nitrógeno gaseoso, propiciando una gran disponibilidad de este fertilizante inorgánico

haber_bosch_in_lab
Friz Haber (derecha) junto a un científico que manipula el método de Haber-Bosch. Esta manera de extraer el nitrógeno atmosférico y convertirlo en amoníaco es considerado, por muchos científicos e historiadores, como el invento más importante de la historia moderna. Sin él, el mundo no habría podido soportar ni la mitad de la demanda alimentaria actual. Fuente: el juicio de friz haber.

EL CASO DEL FÓSFORO

El fósforo, sin embargo, es el tercero en discordia. Esencial para la vida, es el componente estrella del ADN, ARN, ATP (la energía utilizada en los procesos celulares) y de los fosfolípidos, que revisten las membranas celulares. Está presente en los huesos e interviene en casi cualquier proceso biológico animal. Además, es imprescindible para el crecimiento de las plantas: sin fosfato, la fotosíntesis no puede llevarse a cabo. El mayor problema del fósforo es que no se encuentra libre en la naturaleza. Las plantas y, en general, todos los seres vivos, satisfacen sus necesidades de fósforo gracias, principalmente, a otro organismo vivo: los animales, de las plantas y, éstas, de los residuos de los animales  o de sus cadáveres, que liberan el fosfato en el proceso de descomposición. De hecho, los fertilizantes más importantes hasta la llegada de los fertilizantes inorgánicos, ya en el siglo XX, fueron los excrementos y la orina de los animales de granja, que contienen gran cantidad de fósforo, además de los otros elementos ya mencionados. Sin embargo, a raiz del invento de Haber-Bosch y al aumento de la demanda de alimentos a consecuencia del crecimiento poblacional, se empezaron a explotar los yacimientos de fósforo, que se encuentran en forma de minerales y que son realmente escasos en la corteza terrestre.

100_6906
Guano acumulado en un islote de Perú. El guano, junto con los excrementos y la orina de los animales de granja, fue una importante fuente de fósforo hasta el siglo XX. Este sustrato, formado a base de deposiciones continuas de aves marinas, focas y murciélagos, sigue siendo muy apreciado incluso hoy en día, especialmente en la agricultura ecológica. Fuente: Hiding in Honduras.

UN RECURSO ESCASO, INSUSTITUIBLE Y MAL UTILIZADO

El fósforo es un recurso insustituible y no sintetizable. Las reservas son finitas y se están malgastando, ya que gran parte de los fertilizantes aplicados no son asimilados por las plantas y, a través del suelo, acaban en el mar o en los lagos, donde desequilibran los ecosistemas. Al ser un recurso tan escaso, suele ser el recurso limitante en la mayoría de ecosistemas. Es por eso que una sobrefertilización de fósforo suele ser aprovechada por las algas autótrofas para crecer descontroladamente, lo que provoca, en muchos casos, blooms que pueden generar grandes pérdidas animales, económicas y ambientales.

mar-menor
Extensión de la vegetación del Mar Menor (Murcia) en 2014 y 2016. El 85% de la vegetación ha muerto en menos de dos años, debido a fuertes fenómenos de eutrofización, en los que el fósforo ha jugado un papel clave. El exceso de nutrientes hace proliferar las algas, que terminan dificultando el paso de la luz a la vegetación acúatica, produciéndose su muerte. Fuente: El País.

5 PAÍSES CONTROLAN LA PRODUCCIÓN MUNDIAL

El Servicio Geológico de los Estados Unidos (USGS, por sus siglas en inglés) ha estimado las reservas mundiales de fósforo en 71.000 millones de toneladas. El 90% de éstas están en manos de 6 países: Marruecos (donde, según la USGS, se encuentran el 75% de las reservas mundiales de este mineral), China, Argelia, Siria, Sudáfrica y Jordania. No obstante, son Estados Unidos y, sobretodo, China (el 47% de la producción mundial se localiza ahí) los países que, actualmente, están extrayendo mayor fósforo de sus yacimientos. Una producción que ha ido en aumento en los últimos años, y que irá a más en las próximas décadas. Según este reciente artículo de Nature, será necesario duplicar, para el año 2050, el uso de los fertilizantes fosfatados para cubrir la demanda de alimentos, en un mundo donde ya habrá 9.000 millones de humanos. Pero, para entonces, ya se habrá utilizado más de la mitad del fósforo existente en los yacimientos. Este otro estudio alertó de la posibilidad de que estuviéramos alcanzando el punto máximo de la producción de fósforo, si bien nuevos cálculos estiman su punto máximo entorno al año 2040. Sea como sea, de seguir con la producción actual las reservas se agotarán en no más de 100 años. 

phosphate-rock-reserves
Reservas mundiales de roca fosfórica por país. Marruecos capitaliza las reservas, seguida de China y Argelia. Alrededor de un 90% de las reservas mundiales de fósforo se encuentran en África, lo cual hace presuponer un futuro en el que este continente jugará un papel importantísimo en las negociaciones para hacerse con este recurso finito. Fuente: WRForum.

LA GEOPOLÍTICA ENTRA EN ESCENA

Un síntoma de la posible escasez de fósforo en un futuro no muy lejano es la subida de precios del fósforo que se viene observando recientemente, debido a la creciente demanda. Entre 2007 y 2008 el precio de la tonelada de fosfatos llegó a triplicarse respecto a los valores de 2005, y a costar hasta 9 veces más que en los años 70. Además, se ha calculado que para 2035 la demanda de fósforo superará a la oferta, con lo que los precios aumentarán aún más y, con ellos, las tensiones políticas. No ajenos a ello, numerosos países están ya moviendo ficha para asegurarse un suministro de este valioso recurso para unas décadas más. China, por ejemplo, que ahora mismo es el mayor productor (que no el poseedor de las mayores reservas) ha empezado a establecer aranceles del 135% a sus exportaciones. Estados Unidos, por otro lado, ha firmado un tratado de libre comercio bilateral con Marruecos, lo que le de da derechos de explotar sus yacimientos de fosfato a largo plazo. Teniendo en cuenta que la mayor parte de las reservas de fosfato de Marruecos se encuentran en el Sahara Occidental (región que ha luchado por su independencia desde su ocupación en 1975) no es de extrañar que Estados Unidos siempre haya apoyado a Marruecos en el Consejo de Seguridad de Naciones Unidas, vetando cualquier propuesta a favor de la independencia del Sahara Occidental. 

a2
Incremento en los precios de diferentes minerales fosfatados. Se espera un aumento del precio aun mayor en las próximas décadas, a medida que los yacimientos de fosfato vayan agotándose. Fuente: USDA.
cordell
Estimación de la evolución de la producción de roca fosfórica y momento en el que alcanzará el pico de producción. Muchos científicos concuerdan en que las reservas durarán entre 60 y 130 años más. Fuente: Cordell et al., 2009.

LAS SOLUCIONES PASAN POR VOLVER A LAS RAICES

A tenor de las últimas estimaciones, los yacimientos de fósforo se agotarán, afectando a los cultivos de todo el mundo. Esta disminución de la producción alimentaria tendrá una repercursión global, sobretodo en los países más pobres, los más susceptibles a un posible decrecimiento de la producción de alimentos. De no establecer medidas de reducción de la población mundial, la falta de fósforo combinada con el cambio climático provocará tensas relaciones entre numerosos países, pudiendo desembocar en conflictos geopolíticos de escala planetaria.

7920453668_1a42c7b136_k
Según Metson et al. (2016) una dieta basada en los vegetales ayudaría a reducir la demanda de fósforo. Según sus cálculos, una persona vegetariana requiere de, aproximadamente, 4 kg de roca fosfórica al año, casi 3 veces menos que una dieta predominantemente carnívora, que consume cerca de 11.8 kg de fósforo al año. Fuente: Jeremy Keith.

Es por ello que la principal solución pasa por utilizar el fósforo de una manera más racional y de reciclarlo tanto como sea posible. Hoy en día, entorno a un 80% del fósforo se pierde entre la explotación del mineral, su transporte y su aplicación en los campos, lo cual nos exige a hacer un uso más sostenible de este recurso. No obstante, será su reciclaje el que podrá mantener la producción alimentaria mundial. La principal propuesta sería volver a los inicios: recolectar las heces y orina humanas,  generadas en las ciudades y pueblos, para recuperar ese fósforo que de otro modo acabaría en el medio acuático. I es que aproximadamente el 100% del fósforo consumido por la humanidad a través de los alimentos es excretado en forma heces y orina. Recolectarlo sería como un arma de doble filo: por un lado satisfaríamos la demanda de fósforo de los cultivos y, por otro, evitaríamos que un exceso de estos nutrientes eutrofizaran el agua. Por otro lado, promoviendo un cambio en la dieta, priorizando las verduras en lugar de la carne, se lograría reducir la demanda de fósforo entre un 20 y un 45%, según Cordell et al. (2009).  Otras soluciones pasan por recuperar el uso del estiércol en aquellas zonas más rurales y menos tecnificadas y promover el compostaje de los residuos alimentarios en hogares, fábricas y establecimientos comerciales. Por último, un residuo de las depuradoras de aguas residuales, llamado estruvita (fosfato hidratado de amonio y magnesio) podría ayudar a fertilizar los campos de una manera efectiva y limpia.

1280px-struvit_guelleaufbereitung
El  mineral de estruvita, como el de la imagen, es obtenido de forma espontánea en depuradoras de aguas residuales. A pesar de que ocasiona problemas de obstrucción en las tuberías de las depuradoras debido a su cristalización, podría ser utilizado como un sistema limpio de fertilización que aportaría fósforo, nitrógeno y magnesio. Fuente: Creative Commons.

La locura iniciada a principios del siglo XX con la explotación de la roca fosfórica para producir alimentos a mansalva está llegando a su fin, y esto nos exige adaptar nuestros cultivos y, quizá, nuestro estilo de vida, a un futuro que tendrá que beber mucho de la forma de proceder en el pasado. Urge un cambio de mentalidad, centrado en una reducción de la población mundial y una mayor sostenibilidad de los recursos naturales, si de verdad queremos garantizar un mundo en el que ninguna persona tenga que pasar hambre.

BIBLIOGRAFIA

The 5 most threatened species by traditional Chinese medicine

Traditional Chinese medicine has boomed in recent years, thanks to increased purchasing power, especially Chinese Asian middle class. This ancient medicine is based on the concept of vital energy, that invades every corner of the body and organs, and can be acquired through ingested substances, as are parts of various animals. Despite numerous studies, there is no scientific evidence of its benefits to human health. In contrast, there is evidence of an alarming decline in populations of emblematic species such as tigers, rhinos or lions.

INTRODUCTION

3000 years ago emerged, within the Shang Dynasty, a type of medicine that would completely change the life and habits of the Asian people. The basis of traditional Chinese medicine have a strong philosophical component and focus on the concept of ‘Qi’ or vital energy. This energy flows inside the body through channels or meridians, which in turn are connected to organs and bodily functions. The ‘Qi’ regulates the spiritual, physical and emotional balance of the person, and can be altered when the Yin and Yang (negative and positive energy) get unbalanced. This imbalance and alteration of vital energy is what leads to all kinds of diseases.

0023ae8d83ec0f122fcc07
According to traditional Chinese medicine, there is not a specific disease, but sick people. Treatment focuses on the affected organ or organs and the whole body, in order to try to restore the balance between Yin,Yang and meridians. Source: Chinatoday.com.

Since ancient times, diseases have been fought with many remedies, many of them derived from animals. Almost any Asian species has been used for traditional medicine, such as cows, wasps, leeches, scorpions, antelopes, sea horses, dogs or snakes. Despite the zero scientific evidence of its benefits, its popularity has been increasing with the population explosion and the purchasing power of Asian countries, especially China and Vietnam. Many ‘new rich’ find in these products a way to distance themselves from other social classes and show off their new lifestyle. As a result, many species are in danger of extinction in the coming decades if nothing is done about it.

In this article we will have a look at the 5 most threatened species by Chinese medicine, and the actions that are being carried out to improve their situation.

THE 5 MOST THREATENED SPECIES BY CHINESE MEDICINE

Tiger (Panthera tigris)

The tiger is undoubtedly the most emblematic and admired animal by traditional Chinese medicine. Practically all its parts has been used, such as its nose, tail, eyes, whiskers, brain, blood and even penis. Each part has been associated with a particular cure. Eating your brain, for example, combat both laziness and pimples, while the eyes are used to treat malaria and epilepsy.

Unlike other animals used for traditional medicine, tiger parts are not only sold to Asian countries like China, Taiwan, Japan or South Korea, but also to occidental countries, even the United States and United Kingdom. In fact, in cities like London, Birmingham or Manchester you can find products that claim to contain tiger bone. The price of tiger bone is between 140 and 370 dollars per kg in the US, while a cup of tiger penis soup (that it is used to increase virility) reaches 320 dollars.

EndangeredAnimalProductsINLINE
Wine made of Siberian tiger bones. Wine tiger is one of the emerging threats for the species. This bottle costs about 200 dollars and is sold as a luxury product. Source: Takepart.com.

Although there are only  3,200 tigers in the wild (of the 100,000 existing a century ago), there are countries that contain tigers as Myanmar, Laos and Cambodia who have not yet signed the CITES agreement, which means that hunting is still legal. In the airport of Hanoi, for example, it is still possible to buy bones, organs and tiger skins without any difficulty.Te

Despite the ban on trade in tiger bones in China in 1993, the business of the tiger is still a very important business in the country. In fact, as pointed out by the researcher and writer Judit Mills in an interview of Yale Environment 360, from that year the number of tiger farms increased rapidly, reaching, at present, the number of 6000 tigers in these places. Most of these farms are dedicated to the growing business of tiger wine, symbol of high status and wealth among the Chinese population. The tigers are fed like cattle until they are killed to extract their bones, which will be immersed in rice wine. The longer they remain in the broth, the higher the price of the bottles.

Just over a month ago, a scandal involving tigers and traditional medicine splattered the Kanchanaburi Tigers Temple in Thailand. In there, more than 40 dead tiger babies were found in freezers, allegedly in order to deal with them on the black market that involves this mythical species.

14649449596441
Baby tigers in jars were found in the Temple of the Tigers, in Thailand. It is suspected that the Buddhist temple is behind a web of illegal trade in tiger parts. The temple has been closed and monks are being investigated. Source: El Mundo.

Asian black bear (Ursus thibetanus) and sun bear (Helarctos malayanus)

Bear bile has been used in traditional Asian medicine for thousands of years. Yore, bile was extracted once the bear was dead, using its meat as well. However, since 1980 the popularity of this product grew, and a flourishing industry was settled and growing year after year. It is estimated that there are currently more than 12,000 bears in farms bile extraction in China and Vietnam.

Bear-bile-flakes
Bear bile from China is sold in Malaysia. In a recent research conducted by TRAFFIC, of the 365 traditional medicine shops present in Malaysia, almost half of them (175) were selling products containing bear bile. Source: TRAFFIC.

Thanks to its high levels of ursodeoxycholic acid, bear bile can help to treat liver ailments and bladder. However, the extraction of bile causes to bears an unimaginable damage, both physical and psychological. In most cases, bears are confined in cages whose size is like a phone booth, and are continuously sedated so they do not give problems. Poachers make them a hole in the gallbladder and let it drip in order to extract the bile. This heinous practice is still legal in China, although 87% of the population disagrees with this practice.

15461402810_535883675e
In many cases the animals are born and grow in the same cage, to the extent that their bodies just outlined by the own cage bars. Many lose much of their teeth by gnawing the bars continuously to try to escape, or attempt suicide punching themselves in the stomach. In this sad picture we see a sun bear in an illegal farm in Malaysia. Source: Animalsasia.org.

White rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum)

If we look back, it might seem that the situation of the white rhino is excellent. This African species was on the brink of extinction in the early twentieth century, when there were only 100 individuals. Fortunately, thanks to numerous international efforts, the species recovered surprisingly and currently has a population of about 20,000. However, the situation of rhinos is critical again, because of the poachers kill more than a thousand of them every year, which has reignited the alarms for this species.

rhino-horn-tea
A woman prepares tea rhino horn in a cafe in Vietnam. Rhino horn ingested in powder form and is very popular in Vietnam. Among other benefits, it is believed to cure cancer. Source: Marcianosmx.com.

The rhino (the Asian rhino in that time) has been hunted since the dawn of traditional medicine, as there are records of their hunting since 200 B.C. Horns, blood, skin and even urine have been used since ancient times as a remedy for various ailments such as nosebleeds, strokes, seizures and fever. Today, the main goal is his horn, which reaches exorbitant prices on the black market. A rhino horn can reach up to 46,000 euros per kilogram on the Asian black market, which has already been exceeded the price of gold. The business has prospered thanks to this great incentive, the ease of hunting these animals (they are slow, nearsighted and docile) and the lack of vigilance in the countries they live. The main destination for rhino horn is Vietnam, where the belief in their properties is stronger.

Rhino-poaching-numbers-South-Africa-580
South Africa is by far the country that has more white rhinos (around 90%) and the most affected by illegal hunting. In recent years, hunting has suffered an alarming increase. It surprises and scares simultaneously when comparing the only 13 deaths in 2007 with the nearly 1200 deaths occurred in 2015. Source: TRAFFIC.

Pangolin (family Manidae)

Probably, the hunt that has increased more in recent times is the pangolin hunting, especially in China and Vietnam, its main markes. They are hunted for their meat and scales, wich are used for traditional Chinese medicine as a remedy for all kinds of diseases: malaria, anziety,depression, asthma and even cancer. Of course, scientific investigations have found no evidence of health benefits, and it is very unlikey to occur, because their scales are made of keratin, the same material that forms our fingernails and hair, or rhino horns.

pangolin-scales-CRS-TRAFFIC-580
Pangolin scales for sale in Mong La, a tourist city in Myanmar and one of the msin focus on illegal sale of animal parts. One kg of pangolin can be paid at 175 dollars on the black market. Source: TRAFFIC.

Much of the hunted pangolins come from Myanmar, a country that has become, unfortunately, a gateway for most hunted pangolins in Asia or Africa. According to TRAFFIC, in the period from 2010-2014 were seized, only in Myanmar, 4339 kg of pangolin scales and 518 dead bodies. In the Philippines, in April 2013, a fishing boat containing 10,000 kg of pangolin scales was seized, which amount of 20,000 to 25,000 pangolins. With a population in continuous decline, the situation is far from improving. It is no wonder: a hunter, which in many cases has enough to survive, can gain up to 1,000 euros for just a single pangolin.

090714-01-pangolin-fetus-soup_big
Pangolin scales can be prepared and consumed in many different ways, either fried, dried or served with vinegar or sauces. In addition, it is believed that his blood and embryos (as the photo) cure sexual impotence. Source: National Geographic.

Lion (Panthera leo)

Lion has been the latest to join this unfortunate list. It was once one of the most abundant larger cats on the planet, with an estimated population of more than 400,000 individuals in 1950. Nowadays, it is calculated a population of no more than 20,000 individuals, a fact that has placed them in the Red List species in the Vulnerable category.

lion-bones-1448736573
Lion bones placed in the sun to dry them. Once they are dry, they will be sent to Laos and Vietnam, where they will be pulverized. A skeleton as above can be cost 75,000 dollars. Source: LionAid.org.

Although the greatest threat for the lion is still habitat loss, the increase of protect measures for tigers in Asia and their low number has placed the lion as a new target for the mafias, as indicated in this 2015 Nature article. In 1995 it was documented for the first time the use of parts of lion in traditional medicine, when it was discovered several typically tiger products containing lion parts. In December 2009 the CITES agreement allowed the export of skeletons lion to Asia. It is estimated that from that date until the end of 2011 more than 1160 bodies of lions were exported, mostly to Laos and Vietnam. The main use of lion bones is to serve as a substitute of tiger bones as a sexual enhancers.

product-4c-a7-27-11dcbb8f1c2155f382051e5fa3
It is very easy to find products made with bone lion online. Get prices and easy ways to buy online did not cost me more than two minutes. These products, in particular, promise to lengthen the penis and improve sexual potency. Source: Male-sexenhancement.

CURRENT STATUS OF LAWS AND ACTIONS AIMED TO PROTECT ILLEGAL HUNTING OF THESE SPECIES

  • Tiger: Many Asian nations such as China, Nepal, Japan, South Korea and Thailand have pledged to enact laws that prohibit trade of tiger products, preserving their habitat and form a regional network to stop the tigers trade. Hong Kong, which accounts for almost half of exports of tiger parts, has intensified controls, while Taiwan, thanks to a recent trade control law, conducted numerous seizures, arrests and extensive searches for illegal tiger parts.
  • Asian black bear and sun bear: By mid-2015 it was known that an important pharmaceutical Chinese was working on an alternative synthetic product for bear bile. This product could finally end up with the bear bile farms. However, it is still necessary the total abolition of this practice in China.
  • Rhinos: There is a strong debate about legalizing rhino horn trade in South Africa. Some NGOs believe that this would lead to a fall in prices on the black market, while others argue it would raise the demand and mafias would still control the market. TRAFFIC along with Save the Rhino International launched an awareness campaign in Vietnam to persuade consumers of rhinoceros horn to reject its use. In addition, TRAFFIC got the commitment from the Association of Traditional Medicine of Vietnam to promote the reduction of demand of rhino horns.
  • Pangolin: Trade with pangolins and parts is protected by law in Myanmar, the most affected country by illegal trade. In addition, Asian pangolins are included in Appendix II of CITES, which means that international trade is prohibited. China is increasing control of smuggling pangolin, and has already imposed tough penalties to pangolin traffickers.
  • Lions: They are listed in Appendix II of CITES, which means that trading of its parts is strictly controlled. Farms created for lion hunters are the main supply of bones for Chinese medicine, that means that, for now, this phenomenon is having little impact on wild populations.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Ricard-anglès

Los 5 animales más amenazados por la medicina tradicional china

La medicina tradicional china ha experimentado un auge en los últimos tiempos,  gracias al aumento del poder adquisitivo de la clase media asiática, sobretodo la china. Esta medicina ancestral se basa en el concepto de la energía vital, que invade cada uno de los rincones del cuerpo y de los órganos, y que puede ser adquirida a través de substancias ingeridas, como lo son las partes de diversos animales. A pesar de los numerosos estudios realizados, no hay ninguna evidencia científica de sus beneficios para la salud humana. De lo que sí hay evidencia es de una disminución alarmante de las poblaciones de especies tan emblemáticas como los tigres, rinocerontes o leones.

INTRODUCCIÓN

Hace unos 3000 años surgió, en el seno de la dinastía Shang,  un tipo de medicina que iba a cambiar por completo la vida y costumbres de los asiáticos. Las bases de la medicina tradicional china tienen un fuerte componente filosófico y se centran en el concepto del ‘Qi’ o energía vital. Esta energía fluye por el cuerpo de las personas a través de los canales o meridianos, que a su vez están conectados a los órganos y funciones corporales. El ‘Qi’ regula el equilibrio espiritual, físico y emocional de la persona, y puede ser alterado cuando el Yin y el Yang (energía negativa y positiva) se desequilibran. Este desequilibrio y la alteración de la energía vital es lo que conduce a todo tipo de enfermedades.

0023ae8d83ec0f122fcc07
Según la medicina tradicional china, no existe una enfermedad concreta, sino personas enfermas. El tratamiento se centra en el órgano u órganos afectados y en el conjunto del organismo, para intentar reestablecer el equilibrio entre el Yin, el Yang y los meridianos. Fuente: Chinatoday.com
 

Desde la antiguedad se han combatido las enfermedades con infinidad de remedios, muchos de ellos obtenidos a partir de animales. Prácticamente cualquier especie asiática ha sido utilizada para la medicina tradicional, como por ejemplo vacas, avispas, sanguijuelas, escorpiones, antílopes, caballitos de mar, perros o serpientes. A pesar de las nulas evidencias científicas sobre sus beneficios, su popularidad ha ido incrementándose de la mano del aumento de población y de poder adquisitivo de los países asiáticos, especialmente en China y Vietnam. Muchos ‘nuevos ricos’ ven en estos productos una forma de distanciarse de las demás clases sociales y de mostrar su nuevo estilo de vida. Debido a ello, muchas especies corren el peligro de extinguirse en las próximas décadas si no se hace algo al respecto.

En este artículo veremos las 5 especies más perjudicadas por la medicina china, y cuáles son las acciones que se están llevando a cabo para mejorar sus situación.

LAS 5 ESPECIES MÁS AMENAZADAS POR LA MEDICINA TRADICIONAL

Tigre (Panthera tigris)

El tigre és, sin duda, el animal más emblemático y admirado por la medicina tradicional china. Del tigre se ha aprovechado prácticamente todo, desde la nariz a la cola, pasando por ojos, bigotes, cerebro, sangre e incluso pene. Cada parte ha sido asociada a una cura determinada. Comer su cerebro, por ejemplo, combate tanto la pereza como las espinillas, mientras que los ojos se usan para tratar desde la malaria hasta la epilepsia.

A diferencia de otros animales usados para la medicina tradicional, las partes de los tigres no solo son vendidas a países asiáticos como China, Taiwan, Japon o Corea del Sur, sino que han traspasado continentes llegando incluso a Estados Unidos y  Reino Unido. De hecho, en ciudades como Londres, Birmingham o Manchester se pueden encontrar productos que aseguran contener hueso de tigre. El precio de hueso de tigre oscila entre los 140 y 370 dólares por kg en Estados Unidos, mientras que una taza de sopa de pene de tigre (para incrementar la virilidad) alcanza los 320 dólares.

EndangeredAnimalProductsINLINE
Vino de hueso de tigre siberiano. El vino de tigre es una de las amenazas emergentes para la especie. Éste frasco cuesta unos 200 dólares, y es vendido como un producto de lujo. Fuente: Takepart.com.

A pesar de que tan sólo quedan 3200 tigres en libertad (de los 100.000 existentes hace un siglo), hay países que contienen tigres como Myanmar, Laos y Camboya que aún no han firmado el convenio CITES, lo que implica que su caza aún es legal. En el aeropuerto de Hanoi, por ejemplo, aún es posible comprar huesos, órganos y pieles de tigre sin ningún tipo de dificultad.

A pesar de la prohibición del comercio de huesos de tigre en China en el año 1993, el negocio del tigre es aún un negocio muy importante en el país. De hecho, tal y como señala la investigadora y escritora Judit Mills en una entrevista para Yale Environment 360, a partir de ese año las granjas de tigres se dispararon, alcanzando, en la actualidad, la cifra de 6000 tigres en estos lugares. La mayoría de estas granjas se dedican al creciente negocio de vino de tigre, símbolo de alto estatus y riqueza entre la población china. Los tigres son alimentados como ganado, hasta que son sacrificados para extraer sus huesos, que serán sumergidos en vino de arroz. Cuánto más tiempo permanezcan en el caldo, más alto será el precio de las botellas.

Hace poco más de un mes, un escándalo relacionado con los tigres y la medicina tradicional salpicó el Templo de los Tigres de Kanchanaburi, en Tailandia. En él se hallaron más de 40 crías muertas en congeladores, supuestamente para traficar con ellas en el mercado negro que envuelve a esta mítica especie.

14649449596441
Crías de tigres en jarros hallados en el Templo de los Tigres, Tailandia. Se sospecha que el templo budista está detrás de una trama de comercio ilegal de partes de tigre. El templo ha sido clausurado y los monjes están siendo investigados. Fuente: El Mundo.

Oso negro asiático (Ursus thibetanus) y oso malayo (Helarctos malayanus)

La bilis de oso se ha usado en la medicina tradicional asiática desde hace miles de años Antaño, la bilis era extraída una vez se había dado muerte al oso, del que también se usaba su carne.  No obstante, desde 1980 la popularidad de este producto fue creciendo, y una floreciente industría fue asentándose y creciendo año tras año. Se calcula que en la actualidad hay más de 12.000 osos en granjas de extracción de bilis en China y Vietnam.

Bear-bile-flakes
Bilis de oso procedente de China es vendida en Malasia. En una reciente investigación llevada a cabo por TRAFFIC, de las 365 tiendas de medicina tradicional presentes en Malasia, prácticamente la mitad (175) vendían productos que contenían bilis de oso. Fuente: TRAFFIC.

Gracias a sus altos niveles de ácido ursodesoxicólico, la bilis puede ayudar a tratar dolencias en el hígado y la vejiga. No obstante, la extracción de la bilis le causa al oso un daño inimaginable, tanto físicos como psicológicos. En la mayoría de los casos, los osos son confinados en jaulas del tamaño de una cabina telefónica, y son sedados continuamente para que no den problemas. Para extraerles la bilis se les agujerea la vesícula biliar y dejan que ésta gotee. Esta atroz práctica es aún legal en China, a pesar de que el 87% de la población está en desacuerdo con esta práctica.

15461402810_535883675e
En muchos casos, los animales nacen y crecen en la misma jaula, hasta el punto de que sus cuerpos acaban contorneados por las propias barras de las jaulas. Muchos pierden gran parte de los dientes al roer los barrotes continuamente para tratar escapar, o intentan suicidarse dándose puñetazos en el estómago. En esta triste imagen vemos a un oso malayo en una granja ilegal en Malasia. Fuente: Animalsasia.org

Rinoceronte blanco (Ceratotherium simum)

Si echamos la vista atrás, podría parecernos que la situación del rinoceronte blanco es excelente. Y es que esta especie africana estuvo al borde de la extinción a principios del siglo XX, cuando tan sólo contaba con 100 individuos en libertad. Por suerte, gracias a numerosos esfuerzos internacionales, la especie se recuperó sorprendentemente y en la actualidad goza de una población de unos 20.000 ejemplares. Sin embargo, la situación de los rinocerontes vuelve a ser crítica, y es que los furtivos acaban con más de un millar de ellos cada año, lo cual ha vuelto a encender las alarmas para esta especie.

rhino-horn-tea
Una mujer prepara un té de cuerno de rinoceronte en un café de Vietnam. El cuerno de rinoceronte se ingiere en forma de polvo y es muy popular en Vietnam. Entre otros beneficios, se cree que cura el cáncer. Fuente: Marcianosmx.com.

El rinoceronte (en concreto, el asiático) ya se cazaba desde los albores de la medicina tradicional, pues hay registros de su caza desde el año 200 a.C. Aparte de sus cuernos, su sangre, su piel e incluso su orina han sido usados desde antaño, como remedio para diversas dolencias como por ejemplo hemorragias nasales, accidentes cerebrovasculares, convulsiones y fiebres.  Hoy en día, el objetivo principal es su cuerno, que llega a alcanzar precios desorbitantes en el mercado negro. Un cuerno de rinoceronte puede alcanzar hasta los 46.000 euros por kilogramo en el mercado negro asiático, precio que ya supera al del oro. Este gran incentivo, unido a la facilidad de cazar a estos animales (son lentos, cortos de vista y dóciles) y la falta de vigilancia, ha hecho prosperar este negocio. El principal destino de los cuernos de rinoceronte es Vietnam, donde la creencia en sus propiedades es más fuerte.

Rhino-poaching-numbers-South-Africa-580
Sudáfrica es, de lejos, el país que contiene más rinocerontes blancos (entorno a un 90%) y el más afectado por la caza ilegal. En los últimos años su caza ha sufrido un alarmante incremento. Sorprende, y a la vez asusta, ver el aumento experimentado desde el 2007, donde tan sólo hubo 13 bajas, por las casi 1200 del año 2015. Fuente: TRAFFIC

Pangolín (família Manidae)

Probablemente la caza del pangolín para fines medicinales es la que ha sufrido un mayor incremento en los últimos tiempos, sobretodo en China y Vietnam, sus principales mercados. Se los caza por su carne y sus escamas, que son usadas por la medicina tradicional china como remedio para todo tipo de dolencias: malaria, ansiedad, depresión, asma e incluso cáncer. Por supuesto, las investigaciones científicas no han encontrado ninguna evidencia de que beneficie a la salud, y es muy poco probable de que algún día haya alguna, ya que sus escamas están hechas de queratina, el mismo material que forma nuestras uñas y pelo, o los cuernos de los rinocerontes.

pangolin-scales-CRS-TRAFFIC-580
Escamas de pangolín en venta en Mong La, una ciudad turística de Myanmar y foco en venta ilegal de partes de animales. Un kg de pangolin puede pagarse a 175 dólares en el mercado negro. Fuente: TRAFFIC.

Gran parte de los pangolines cazados provienen de Myanmar, país que se ha convertido, desgraciadamente, en puerta de entrada para la mayoría de los pangolines cazados en Asia o África. Según TRAFFIC, en el período que va de 2010 a 2014 fueron incautados, sólo en Myanmar, 4339 kg de escamas de pangolín y 518 cuerpos enteros. En Filipinas, en abril de 2013, se incautó un barco pesquero que contenía 10.000 kg de escamas de pangolín, lo que según los cálculos podría suponer entre 20.000 y 25.000 pangolines. Con una población en continuo descenso, la situación dista mucho de mejorar. Y no es para menos: un cazador, que en muchos casos tiene lo justo para subsistir, puede cobrar hasta 1000 euros por tan sólo un pangolín.

090714-01-pangolin-fetus-soup_big
Las escamas de pangolín se pueden preparar y consumir de muy diversas formas, ya sea fritas, secas o servidas con vinagre o salsas. Ademas, se cree que su sangre y los embriones (como el de la foto) curan la impotencia sexual. Fuente: National Geographic.

 León (Panthera leo)

Ha sido el último en unirse a esta lamentable lista. Otrora fue uno de los grandes felinos más abundantes del planeta, con una población calculada de más de 400.000 individuos en el año 1950. En la actualidad se calcula una población de poco más de 20.000 individuos, hecho que le ha situado en la Lista Roja de las especies en la categoría de especie Vulnerable.

lion-bones-1448736573
Huesos de león puestos al sol para secarlos. Una vez estén secos, serán enviados a Laos y Vietnam, donde serán pulverizados. Un esqueleto como los de arriba puede llegar a valer 75.000 dólares. Fuente: LionAid.org.

A pesar de que la mayor amenaza para el león sigue siendo la pérdida de hábitat, el aumento de las medidas de protección para los tigres en Asia y su bajo número habría situado al león como un nuevo objetivo para las mafias, como señala este artículo del 2015 de Nature. En 1995 se documentó por primera vez el uso de partes de león en la medicina tradicional, al descubrirse que varios productos, que tipicamente eran elaborados a partir de tigres, contenían partes de león. En diciembre de 2009 el convenio CITES permitió la exportación de esqueletos de león a Asia. Se calcula que desde esa fecha hasta finales de 2011 se exportaron más de 1160 cuerpos de leones, la mayoría con destino a Laos y Vietnam. El principal uso de los huesos de león es servir como substitutivo de los huesos de tigre como potenciadores sexuales.

product-4c-a7-27-11dcbb8f1c2155f382051e5fa3
Es muy fácil encontrar productos hechos con hueso de león por internet. Obtener precios y formas fáciles de comprar a distancia no me costó más de dos minutos. Estos productos, en concreto, prometen alargar el pene y mejorar la potencia sexual. Fuente: Male-sexenhancement.

ESTADO ACTUAL DE LAS LEYES Y ACCCIONES DESTINADAS A PROTEGER LA CAZA ILEGAL DE ESTAS ESPECIES

  • Tigre: Muchas naciones asiáticas como China, Nepal, Japón, Corea del Sur y Tailandia se han comprometido a promulgar leyes que prohiban el comercio de productos derivados del tigre, preservar su hábitat y formar una red regional para detener el comercio de tigres. Hong Kong, que concentra casi la mitad de las exportaciones de partes de tigre, ha intensificado los controles, mientras que Taiwán, a partir de una reciente ley de control del comercio, llevó a cabo numerosas incautaciones, detenciones y extensos registros en tiendas de medicina china.
  • Oso negro asiatico y malayo: A mediados de 2015 se conoció la noticia de que una importante farmacéutica china estaba trabajando en un producto sintético alternativo. Dicho producto podría acabar con las granjas de bilis de oso. No obstante, es necesario la prohibición de dicha práctica en China.
  • Rinocerontes: Hay un fuerte debate acerca de la legalización del comercio de cuernos de rinoceronte en Sudáfrica. Algunas ONG consideran que eso conllevaría a una caída de precios en el mercado negro, mientras que otros alegan que elevaría su demanda y las mafias seguirían controlando el mercado. TRAFFIC junto con Save the Rhino International iniciaron una campaña de concienciación en Vietnam para persuadir a los consumidores de cuerno de rinoceronte a rechazar su uso. Además, TRAFFIC consiguió el compromiso por parte de la Asociación de Medicina Tradicional de Vietnam para que fomente la reducción de la demanda de los cuernos de rinoceronte.
  • Pangolín: El comercio con pangolines y sus partes está protegido por ley en Myanmar, el país más afectado por su comercio ilegal. Además, los pangolines asiáticos están incluidos en el Apéndice II de la CITES, lo que significa que su comercio internacional está totalmente prohibido. China está incrementando el control del tráfico ilegal de pangolín, y ya se han llegado a imponer duras penas para los traficantes.
  • Leones: Figuran en el Apéndice II de CITES, lo que significa que el comercio de sus partes está estrictamente controlado. Las granjas de leones creadas para los cazadores son el principal suministro de huesos para la medicina china, por lo que, de momento, este fenómeno está teniendo poco impacto en las poblaciones salvajes.

BIBLIOGRAFIA

Ricard-castellà

Madagascar: a paradise in danger

The country is suffering a great social, political and ecological crisis which is threatening the survival of much of its biodiversity, unique in the world. Selective logging of Madagascar rosewood is causing a biological crisis unprecedented in the country. Lemurs, one of the most affected groups, are treading on thin ice.

INTRODUCTION

When the French botanist Jean-Henri Humbert set foot on the massif of Marojejy for the first time, in 1948, he was so astonished of what he saw that 7 years later he published Une merveille de la nature à Madagascar, a book which exalted the incredible biodiversity and pristine forests present in the region1. The fact is that Marojejy is possibly the best example of the rich and varied fauna and flora that Madagascar holds and, hence, the best indicator to take notice when the island begins to show signs of collapse. Unfortunately, both the region and the whole of Madagascar live days of uncertainty, and the fear of the disappearance of this treasure is becoming more real day after day.

Silky_Sifaka_Pink_Face_Closeup
A silky sifaka (Propithecus candidus) in Marojejy (Photo: Simponafotsy, Creative Commons).
5729172910_47145d1431_o
The fossa (Cryptoprocta ferox) is the largest carnivore in Madagascar, and endemic to the island (Photo: Becker1999).

Madagascar, the world’s fourth largest island, has an area of just over the Iberian Peninsula and contains a unique biological wealth. Despite its size and the relative proximity to the African continent, it has remained isolated from other continents since 80 million years ago, causing the local flora and wildlife have evolved independently from the rest. As a result, more than 90% of Madagascar’s species are considered unique in the world2. A 90% of reptiles3, 60% of birds4 and 80% of the island flora5 are endemic, as well as some unique lineages of mammals such as lemurs and fossas. However, all are at imminent risk of extinction due to the events experienced in the country in the recent years.

Deforestation-of-TRF-a-case-study-of-Madagascar_img_3
Almost 80% of the original forest has already disappeared. A 90% of Madagascar’s endemic species live on the forest (Image: EOI).

CAUSES OF THE ECOLOGICAL CRISIS IN THE COUNTRY

Deforestation has been present on the island since its colonization by humans, approximately 2000 years ago. However, in recent years, the delicate political situation in the country has led to their forests to their limits. With an unprecedented population growth, an extreme poverty (one of the highest in the world 6, 7) and a pressing political crisis, the nature of the island is helpless and besieged by multiple fronts. In addition to the traditional system of slash and burn deforestation, which allows local people to open forests to cultivate, it has appeared an unexpected player led by international companies. Selective logging of species of the genus Dalbergia (rosewood), rare in the forests and precious in the developed world due to its characteristic color and the strength of its wood, has become the main threat for the biodiversity of the island. It must be added, to the direct impact that involves the extraction of specific species of forest, resulting threats that can be even more damaging for the biodiversity, such as poaching, opening roads, habitat alteration, introduction of invasive species or intimidation of local populations by criminal organizations that manage the illegal exploitation8.

loads-rosewood-Toamasina-009
Rosewood illegal shipment in the Toamasina’s port, Madagascar (Photo: The Guardian).

Selective logging, present and endemic for decades, took a breather in 2000, thanks to its ban in National Parks. However, due to a deep political crisis occurred in 2009, which ended with a coup d’etat, the situation got out of hand, and criminal organizations took control, entering with impunity in the National Parks of the country9. Many of these National Parks are literally being swept away and looted, and they are nothing more than a mirage of what they were once. Despite the restoration of democracy in 201310 and the promises of the elected president to end the “plague” that selective logging of rosewood was causing to the country11, nothing is being done to fight against poaching.

Masoala-Logging-Camp_Toby-Smith-photo
Masoala logging camp, storing timber from Masoala National Park (Photo by Toby Smith, National Geographic).

WHICH COUNTRIES ARE BEHIND POACHING?

China is by far, the major importer of illegal timber from Madagascar. The main reasons are the growth of its middle class, which demands new furniture in line with their new standard of living, and the facilities granted by China due to its lax legislation on illegal timber12. A considerable part of this wood is used to make furniture in the style of the Ming Dynasty, which can be sold for $ 20,000. As there is no control on the illegal timber entering to the country, it is impossible to trace their origin. That’s why, in many cases, furniture and musical instruments manufactured in Europe or North America have been made with some or all with illegal timber13.

1201cmg2
French transport company (CMA CMG Delmas) loading illegal timber in Madagascar (Photo: Mongabay).
Rosewood-Vase-Shop_Erik-Patel-photo
Factory processing rosewood timber (Photo by Erik Patel, National Geographic).

BIODIVERSITY IN DANGER

Due to the opening of roads to remove rosewood timber, lemurs and other native species have become the target of poachers. At the beginning of the political crisis of 2009, a huge amount of lemurs and other wildlife were hunted to feed the thousands of loggers who often live in the forest while carrying out the logging. However, later, a luxury market which involved lemurs emerged, supplying restaurants with its meal in the larger cities and selling them as a delicacy.

Hunted_Silky_Sifakas
Silky sifakas and white head lemurs (Eulemur albifrons) hunted to be sold as food (Photo: Simponafotsy, Creative Commons).
Sin título
Silky sifakas and white head lemurs (Eulemur albifrons) hunted to be sold as food (Photo: Marojejy Website).
0820lemur
A red-ruffed lemur (Varecia rubra), critically endangered, lies dead victim of poaching (Photo: Mongabay).

Although the amount of death lemurs at the hands of poachers is unknown, there are many species that are suffering the impact, many of them in serious danger of extinction like the indri lemur -the largest lemur alive-, the Tattersall’s sifaka or the silky sifaka. The latter, has just a population estimated of 300 individuals. The situation of lemurs is so dramatic that a study of 2012 warned that 90% of the 103 species of lemurs should be on the Red List14. In addition, 23 of them should be qualified as Critically Endangered, the highest threat level.

Indri_indri_001
An indri (Indri indri). This specie is Critically Endangered (Photo: Erik Pattel).
Propithecus_tattersalli_001
A Tattersall’s sifaka (Propithecus tattersalli). This specie is Critically Endangered (Photo: Jeff Gibbs).

During this time it has also been an increase of trade of wild animals to serve as exotic pets, mainly affecting chameleons and turtles15, but has also been intensified the smuggling of lemurs16. In fact, a study of 2015 estimated that the number of lemurs captured in freedom for the exotic pet market could reach the creepy number of 28,000 in the last 3 years17.

pets-11
A ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) in a pet cage. The smuggling to supply the exotic pet market is decimating its population (Photo: Importance of lemurs).

IS THERE ANY LONG TERM SOLUTION?

There is always a way to make things get better. Here there is some of them:

  • Avoid selective logging of rosewood should be the number one priority to reduce the collateral damage it generates. Since 2011 the Malagasy species of the genus Dalbergia belong to CITES Appendix 3, granting them a greater degree of protection and regulating their trade. However, the controls remain inefficient and wood is coming from Madagascar towards the ports of China. In 2013, CITES urged China to increase controls in ports, but nothing was done about it. As indicated in this 2015 article of The guardian18, illegal timber from Madagascar continues entering in large amounts, because Chinese law allows importing timber without requiring export permits.
  • Effective monitoring forest by independent observers could yield results. In fact, this system has already been implemented in countries such as Cambodia and Cameroon, achieving good results19.
  • DNA fingerprinting is another method that it has recently been used on confiscated ivory to determine which populations of African elephants are being hunted. DNA testing has already been applied recently to track limber in other countries20.
  • Finally, it is necessary that each and every one of us avoid purchasing exotic pets from Madagascar if there is no legal certification that tells us we are not damaging them.

With all these solutions, an increase of public awareness and a greater international responsability regarding environmental problems, it may still has a glimmer of hope for wildlife in Madagascar.

REFERENCES

  1. http://www.marojejy.com/Intro_e.htm
  2. Hobbes & Dolan (2008), p. 517
  3. Okajima, Yasuhisa; Kumazawa, Yoshinori (15 July 2009). “Mitogenomic perspectives into iguanid phylogeny and biogeography: Gondwanan vicariance for the origin of Madagascan oplurines”.Gene(Elsevier441 (1–2): 28–35. doi:1016/j.gene.2008.06.011.PMID 18598742.
  4. Conservation International (2007).“Madagascar and the Indian Ocean Islands”Biodiversity Hotspots. Conservation International. Archived from the original on 24 August 2011. Retrieved 24 August 2011.
  5. Callmander, Martin; et. al (2011). “The endemic and non-endemic vascular flora of Madagascar updated”. Plant Ecology and Evolution144 (2): 121–125. doi:5091/plecevo.2011.513. Archived from the original (PDF) on 11 February 2012. Retrieved 11 February 2012.
  6. http://www.wildmadagascar.org/overview/FAQs/why_is_Madagascar_poor.html
  7. http://allafrica.com/stories/201510070931.html
  8. http://www.marojejy.com/Breves_e.htm
  9. http://news.mongabay.com/2009/08/lessons-from-the-crisis-in-madagascar-an-interview-with-erik-patel/
  10. http://newafricanmagazine.com/madagascar-a-new-political-crisis/
  11. http://news.mongabay.com/2015/09/activist-arrested-while-illegal-loggers-chop-away-at-madagascars-forests/
  12. http://news.mongabay.com/2009/12/major-international-banks-shipping-companies-and-consumers-play-key-role-in-madagascars-logging-crisis/
  13. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100527141957.htm
  14. http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-18825901
  15. http://www.ecologiablog.com/post/4016/malasia-se-incauta-de-300-tortugas-en-peligro-de-extincion-procedentes-de-madagascar
  16. http://news.mongabay.com/2009/03/conservation-groups-condemn-open-and-organized-plundering-of-madagascars-natural-resources/
  17. http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract;jsessionid=AC9F12B7B37BD27ED8538264F7A0B46B.journals?aid=10245472&fileId=S003060531400074X
  18. http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/feb/16/rosewood-madagascar-china-illegal-rainforest
  19. http://www.trocaire.org/sites/trocaire/files/resources/policy/2006-forest-monitoring.pdf
  20. http://voices.nationalgeographic.com/2010/05/20/madagascar_logging_crisis/
  21. Imagen de portada: Alexis Dittberner, n0mad.mu project.

Ricard-anglès

Madagascar: un paraíso en peligro

La crisis social, política y ecológica en la que vive sumido el país amenaza la supervivencia de gran parte de su biodiversidad, única en el mundo. La tala selectiva del palo rosa de Madagascar está provocando una crisis biológica sin precedentes en el país. Los lémures, uno de los grupos más afectados, se encuentran en la cuerda floja.

INTRODUCCIÓN

Cuando el botánico francés Jean-Henri Humbert pisó por primera vez el macizo de Marojejy, en el año 1948, quedó tan maravillado por lo que vio, que 7 años después publicó Une merveille de la nature à Madagascar, un libro que ensalzaba la increíble biodiversidad y los prístinos bosques presentes en la región1. Y es que Marojejy es, posiblemente, el mayor exponente de la rica y variada fauna y flora que atesora Madagascar y, a la vez, el mejor indicador al que acudir cuando la isla empieza a dar síntomas de colapso. Desgraciadamente, tanto la región como el conjunto de Madagascar viven días de incertidumbre, y el temor a que este tesoro desaparezca es cada día más real.

Silky_Sifaka_Pink_Face_Closeup
Un sifaca sedoso (Propithecus candidus) en Marojejy (Foto: Simponafotsy, Creative Commons).
5729172910_47145d1431_o
El fosa (Cryptoprocta ferox) es el carnívoro más importante de Madagascar, y endémico de la isla (Foto: Becker1999).

Madagascar, la cuarta isla más grande del mundo, cuenta con una superficie algo superior a la Península Ibérica, y goza de una riqueza biológica única. A pesar de su tamaño y a la relativa cercanía al continente africano, se ha mantenido aislada del resto de continentes desde hace 80 millones de años, provocando que la flora y la fauna locales hayan evolucionado de forma independiente al resto. Como resultado, más del 90% de las especies de Madagascar se consideran únicas en el mundo2. El 90% de los reptiles3,  el 60% de las aves4 y el 80% de la flora5 de la isla son endémicos, así como algunos linajes de mamíferos únicos, como el de los lémures y el de los fosas. No obstante, todos ellos corren un riesgo inminente de desaparición debido a los acontecimientos vividos en el país en los últimos años.

Deforestation-of-TRF-a-case-study-of-Madagascar_img_3
Un 80% del bosque original ha desaparecido. El 90% de los endemismos de Madagascar vive en los bosques (Imagen: EOI).

CAUSAS DE LA CRISIS BIOLÓGICA QUE VIVE EL PAÍS

La deforestación ha estado presente en la isla desde su colonización por los humanos, hace unos 2000 años. No obstante, en los últimos años, la delicada situación política que vive el país ha llevado a sus bosques a una situación límite. Con un crecimiento de la población sin precedentes, una pobreza extrema (una de las más altas del mundo6, 7) y una crisis política acuciante, la naturaleza de la isla se encuentra desamparada y asediada por múltiples frentes. Al sistema de deforestación tradicional de tala y quema (slash and burn), que permite abrir los bosques para su cultivo, ha aparecido un actor inesperado dirigido por empresas internacionales. La tala selectiva de las especies del género Dalbergia (conocidas en el mundo anglosajón como rosewood), raras dentro del bosque y preciadas en el mundo desarrollado debido a su característico color y a la fortaleza de su madera, se ha convertido en la principal amenaza para la biodiversidad de la isla. Al impacto per se que comporta la extracción de especies concretas del bosque, se añaden amenazas derivadas que pueden ser incluso más perjudiciales, como son la caza furtiva, apertura de caminos, alteración del hábitat, introducción de especies invasoras o la intimidación de las poblaciones locales por parte de las organizaciones criminales que gestionan la explotación ilegal8

loads-rosewood-Toamasina-009
Cargamento de palo rosa ilegal en el Puerto de Toamasina, Madagascar (Foto: The Guardian).

La tala selectiva, presente y endémica desde hace décadas, dio un respiro en el año 2000, gracias a su prohibición en parques nacionales. No obstante, a raíz de la profunda crisis política de Madagascar del año 2009, que culminó con un golpe de estado, la situación se descontroló, y las organizaciones criminales tomaron el control, entrando con total impunidad en los parques nacionales del país9. Muchos de estos parques nacionales están siendo literalmente barridos y saqueados, y no son más que un espejismo de lo que fueron. A pesar de la restauración de la democracia en 201310 y de las promesas de su presidente electo de acabar con la “plaga” -según sus propias palabras- que estaba suponiendo la tala selectiva de palo rosa en el país11, nada se está haciendo para combatir a los furtivos.

Masoala-Logging-Camp_Toby-Smith-photo
Campamento maderero de Masoala, almacenando madera del parque nacional de Masoala (Foto de Toby Smith, National Geographic).

¿QUÉ PAÍSES ESTÁN DETRÁS DEL FURTIVISMO?

China es, de lejos, el importador mayoritario de la madera ilegal procedente de Madagascar. Las principales razones son el crecimiento de su clase media, que demanda mobiliario nuevo acorde con su nuevo nivel de vida, y las facilidades que concede China debido a su laxa legislación referente a la madera ilegal12. Una parte considerable de esta madera es utilizada para confeccionar muebles al estilo de la dinastía Ming, que llegan a alcanzar los 20.000 dólares.  Al no haber control acerca de la madera ilegal que entra en el país, es imposible seguir el rastro de su procedencia. Es por eso que, en muchos casos, mobiliario e instrumentos musicales fabricados en Europa o América del Norte han sido elaborados con parte o la totalidad de madera ilegal13.

1201cmg2
Empresa de transportes francesa (CMA CMG Delmas) cargando madera ilegal en Madagascar (Foto: Mongabay).
Rosewood-Vase-Shop_Erik-Patel-photo
Fábrica de tratamiento de la madera de palo rosa (Foto de Erik Patel, National Geographic).

BIODIVERSIDAD EN PELIGRO

Debido a la apertura de caminos para extraer la madera de palo rosa, los lémures y otras especies autóctonas se han convertido en el blanco de los cazadores furtivos. Al inicio de la crisis política del año 2009, una cantidad descomunal de lémures y otros animales salvajes fueron cazados para alimentación por los miles de madereros que suelen vivir en el bosque mientras se lleva a cabo la tala. No obstante, más adelante surgió un mercado de lujo entorno a los lémures, surtiendo a los restaurantes de las ciudades más grandes y vendiéndolos como un manjar.

Hunted_Silky_Sifakas
Sifacas sedosos y lémures de cabeza blanca (Eulemur albifrons) cazados para ser vendidos como comida  (Foto: Simponafotsy, Creative Commons).
Sin título
Sifacas sedosos y lémures de cabeza blanca (Eulemur albifrons) cazados para ser vendidos como comida (Foto: Marojejy Website).
0820lemur
Un lémur rufo rojo (Varecia rubra), en peligro crítico de extinción, yace muerto víctima de la caza furtiva (Foto: Mongabay).

Aunque la cifra de lémures muertos a manos de los furtivos es desconocida, hay numerosas especies que están sufriendo las consecuencias, muchas en grave peligro de extinción como el indri –el lémur más grande que existe- , el sifaca de Tattersall o el sifaca sedoso. De este último se calcula una población de unos 300 individuos. La situación de los lémures es tan dramática que un estudio del año 2012 alertó de que el 90% de las 103 especies de lémures deberían estar en la Lista Roja14. Además, 23 de ellas deberían estar calificadas como especies en Peligro Crítico de Extinción, el nivel más alto de amenaza.

Indri_indri_001
Un indri (Indri indri). La especie se encuentra en Peligro Crítico de Extinción (Foto: Erik Pattel).
Propithecus_tattersalli_001
Un sifaca de Tattersall (Propithecus tattersalli). La especie se encuentra en Peligro Crítico de extinción (Foto: Jeff Gibbs).

Durante este tiempo también se ha observado un incremento del comercio de animales salvajes para servir como mascotas exóticas, afectando principalmente a camaleones y tortugas15, aunque también se ha intensificado el contrabando de lémures16. De hecho, un estudio del año 2015 estimó que la cifra de lémures capturados en libertad para el mercado de mascotas exóticas podría alcanzar la espeluznante cifra de 28.000 ejemplares en los últimos 3 años17.

pets-11
Un lémur de cola anillada (Lemur catta) en una jaula para mascotas. Su contrabando para surtir el mercado de mascotas exóticas está diezmando su población (Foto: Importance of lemurs).

¿HAY SOLUCIONES A LARGO PLAZO?

Siempre hay soluciones si hay voluntad. Aquí hay algunas de ellas:

  • Evitar la tala selectiva del palo rosa debería ser la prioridad número 1 para reducir los daños colaterales que genera. Desde 2011 las especies malgaches del género Dalbergia pertenecen al Apéndice 3 de CITES, otorgándoles un mayor grado de protección y regulando su comercio. Sin embargo, los controles siguen siendo ineficientes y la madera sigue saliendo de Madagascar dirección a los puertos de China. En 2013, CITES instó a China a incrementar los controles en sus puertos, pero nada se hizo al respecto. Como señala este artículo de 2015 de The guardian18, la madera ilegal procedente de Madagascar sigue entrando en ingentes cantidades, ya que la legislación china permite importar madera sin exigir permisos de exportación.
  • Una monitorización efectiva del bosque por parte de observadores independientes podría dar resultados. De hecho, este sistema ya se ha aplicado en países como Camboya y Camerún, logrando buenos resultados19.
  • Otro método para conseguir dar caza a los furtivos sería el sistema, cada vez más usado, de reconocimiento de la huella dactilar. Ya ha sido usado en marfil confiscado para identificar que poblaciones de elefantes están siendo cazadas, y ya se ha aplicado recientemente en madera ilegal de otros países20.
  • Para acabar, es necesario que todos y cada uno de nosotros evitemos adquirir mascotas exóticas procedentes de Madagascar si no hay una certificación legal que nos indique que no les estamos causando ningún perjuicio.

Con todas estas soluciones, el aumento de la concienciación de la población y una mayor seriedad internacional referente a problemas ambientales, es posible que aún haya un rayo de esperanza para la vida salvaje en Madagascar.

REFERENCIAS

  1. http://www.marojejy.com/Intro_e.htm
  2. Hobbes & Dolan (2008), p. 517
  3. Okajima, Yasuhisa; Kumazawa, Yoshinori (15 July 2009). “Mitogenomic perspectives into iguanid phylogeny and biogeography: Gondwanan vicariance for the origin of Madagascan oplurines”.Gene(Elsevier441 (1–2): 28–35. doi:1016/j.gene.2008.06.011.PMID 18598742.
  4. Conservation International (2007).“Madagascar and the Indian Ocean Islands”Biodiversity Hotspots. Conservation International. Archived from the original on 24 August 2011. Retrieved 24 August 2011.
  5. Callmander, Martin; et. al (2011). “The endemic and non-endemic vascular flora of Madagascar updated”. Plant Ecology and Evolution144 (2): 121–125. doi:5091/plecevo.2011.513. Archived from the original (PDF) on 11 February 2012. Retrieved 11 February 2012.
  6. http://www.wildmadagascar.org/overview/FAQs/why_is_Madagascar_poor.html
  7. http://allafrica.com/stories/201510070931.html
  8. http://www.marojejy.com/Breves_e.htm
  9. http://news.mongabay.com/2009/08/lessons-from-the-crisis-in-madagascar-an-interview-with-erik-patel/
  10. http://newafricanmagazine.com/madagascar-a-new-political-crisis/
  11. http://news.mongabay.com/2015/09/activist-arrested-while-illegal-loggers-chop-away-at-madagascars-forests/
  12. http://news.mongabay.com/2009/12/major-international-banks-shipping-companies-and-consumers-play-key-role-in-madagascars-logging-crisis/
  13. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100527141957.htm
  14. http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-18825901
  15. http://www.ecologiablog.com/post/4016/malasia-se-incauta-de-300-tortugas-en-peligro-de-extincion-procedentes-de-madagascar
  16. http://news.mongabay.com/2009/03/conservation-groups-condemn-open-and-organized-plundering-of-madagascars-natural-resources/
  17. http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract;jsessionid=AC9F12B7B37BD27ED8538264F7A0B46B.journals?aid=10245472&fileId=S003060531400074X
  18. http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/feb/16/rosewood-madagascar-china-illegal-rainforest
  19. http://www.trocaire.org/sites/trocaire/files/resources/policy/2006-forest-monitoring.pdf
  20. http://voices.nationalgeographic.com/2010/05/20/madagascar_logging_crisis/
  21. Imagen de portada: Alexis Dittberner, n0mad.mu project.

Ricard-castellà

El pangolín: la caza lo condena a la extinción

Ni el tigre, ni el elefante, ni el rinoceronte: el mamífero más cazado por el humano es el pangolín, desconocido para muchos, hasta el punto de amenazar críticamente su supervivencia como especie. Descubre al único mamífero con escamas, su estado actual de conservación y qué podemos hacer para evitar la extinción de las ocho especies que existen.

¿QUÉ ES UN PANGOLÍN?

manis tricuspis, pangolin, árbol, tree, trepando
Pangolín arborícola (Phataginus tricuspis). (Foto de Bart Wursten).

El nombre pangolín  incluye 8 especies  diferentes distribuidas por una gran variedad de hábitats (bosques húmedos tropicales, bosques secos, campos de sabana, campos abiertos cultivados)  de África y Asia. Miden entre 90 cm y 1,65 m. Son la única familia del orden Pholidota: aunque físicamente parecidos, los armadillos, perezosos y osos hormigueros no son parientes suyos (orden Xenarthra). La mayoría son de hábitos nocturnos, solitarios y de comportamiento tímido, por lo que aún quedan muchos interrogantes sobre su biología y comportamiento en libertad (no suelen sobrevivir al cautiverio).

MORFOLOGÍA

Los pangolines son los únicos mamíferos con escamas: están formadas por queratina (igual que nuestras uñas) y les confieren un aspecto como de piña o alcachofa. Las tienen muy afiladas y pueden moverlas voluntariamente. En caso de sentirse amenazados, silban y resoplan, se enrollan en forma de bola dejando las escamas expuestas y segregan ácidos pestilentes para ahuyentar a sus depredadores (tigres, leones, panteras… y humanos).

leon, leona, pangolin, bola, lion, defensa
Una defensa impenetrable hasta para una leona. (Foto de Holly Cheese)

Las zarpas les permiten tanto trepar como excavar: los pangolines terrestres se refugian y crían en galerías bajo tierra y los arborícolas hacen lo propio en huecos de los árboles. La cola del pangolín arborícola es prensil para sujetarse de las ramas. Además, los pangolines son excelentes nadadores.

Son animales principalmente bípedos: las zarpas delanteras son tan grandes que les obligan a andar sobre las patas posteriores, con una velocidad máxima de 5 km/h. Observa un pangolín caminando y alimentándose:

ALIMENTACIÓN

El pangolín no tiene dientes y es incapaz de masticar. Se alimenta de hormigas y termitas, que localiza con su poderoso sentido del olfato (la vista está poco desarrollada) y atrapa con su pegajosa y larga lengua (puede ser más larga que el propio cuerpo, hasta 40 cm).  Las piedras que ingiere involuntariamente y estructuras córneas puntiagudas en su estómago le ayudan a machacar los exoesqueletos de los insectos. Con sus potentes zarpas destrozan los nidos de sus presas para acceder a ellas y evitan su ataque taponando sus orejas y fosas nasales, además de poseer un párpado blindado. Se calcula que pueden consumir unos 70 millones de insectos anuales, lo que los convierte en importantes reguladores de la población de hormigas y termitas.

lengua, pangolin, tongue
Lengua del pangolín. (Foto de Wim Vorster).

REPRODUCCIÓN

Los pangolines pueden reproducirse en cualquier época del año. Después de la gestación (de dos a cinco meses, según la especie) nace una sola cría (especies africanas) o hasta tres (especies asiáticas).

pangolin, hembra, female, mamas, breast, pecho, tetas
Pangolín hembra. (Foto de Scott Hurd)

El pangolín nace con las escamas blandas, que empiezan a endurecerse al cabo de dos días. Cuando al cabo de un mes salen al exterior, se desplazan sobre la cola de su madre y se independizan a los 3-4 meses. Se desconoce su esperanza de vida, aunque en cautividad un ejemplar vivió hasta los 20 años.

pangolin, baby, cría, zoo bali
Hembra de pangolín transportando su cría. Zoo de Bali. (Foto de Firdia Lisnawati)

AMENAZAS Y CONSERVACIÓN

Además de la destrucción de su hábitat, la principal amenaza a la que se enfrentan los pangolines es la caza directa para el consumo humano. A pesar de existir leyes internacionales para protegerlo, se calcula que se cazan unos 100 mil pangolines anuales. Dada la estrategia de defensa de este animal, los cazadores furtivos se limitan a cogerlos del suelo. Igual que sucede con otras especies, como los tiburones, el mercado gastronómico y la medicina tradicional son los principales causantes de dirigir al pangolín hacia la extinción.

pangolin, jaulas, tráfico ilega, illegal trade, bushmeat
Comercio ilegal de pangolín. (Foto de Soggydan Benenovitch).

¿POR QUÉ SE CAZA AL PANGOLÍN?

  • La carne se considera una delicatessen y un indicador de alto status social en Vietnam y China. La sopa de feto de pangolín se vende como un elixir para aumentar la virilidad y la producción de leche materna. El precio de la carne en el mercado negro puede llegar a 300$ por kilo. El precio por ejemplar puede ser de 1000$.
sopa, feto, soup, pangolin, feto, fetus
Sopa de feto de pangolín. (Foto de TRAFFIC).
  • La sangre se vende como un tónico para mejorar la salud y como  afrodisíaco.
  • Las escamas pueden alcanzar los 3000$ por kilo y se cree que sirven para cualquier cosa: curar desde el acné hasta el cáncer. Curioso dato teniendo en cuenta que tienen la misma estructura que nuestras uñas.
pangolín, china, medicina, medicine, tradicional, cura para el cáncer
Productos de la medicina tradicional china hechos con pangolín. (Foto cortesía de WWW/TRAFFIC/UICN).

Todos esos supuestos efectos medicinales y mágicos no tienen ninguna base científica, lo que convierte todavía más en un sinsentido el tráfico ilegal de pangolín.

CONSERVACIÓN

Las tendencia de las poblaciones de todas las especies de pangolín es el descenso, en algunos casos hasta límites alarmantes. La lista roja de la IUCN (Unión Internacional para la Conservación de la Naturaleza) los clasifica como sigue:

Lista roja IUCN
Categorías de la lista roja de la IUCN. (Imagen de iucn.org)

Debido a su estado, la IUCN reestableció en 2012 un grupo de especialistas dentro de la Comisión de Supervivencia de las Especies (Species Survival Commission -SSC-) dedicado exclusivamente a los pangolines (Pangolin Specialist Group -PangolinSG-). Su objetivo principal es la investigación para aumentar el conocimiento de los pangolines, las amenazas que sufren y cómo pueden ser mitigadas para facilitar su conservación.

Los proyectos de conservación que se están llevando a cabo incluyen campañas para disminuir la demanda de carne y escamas de pangolín, así como el endurecimiento de las leyes. Aun así, el desconocimiento total de las poblaciones y su baja supervivencia en cautividad para la reproducción hace difícil el diseño de estrategias para su conservación.

¿QUÉ PUEDES HACER TÚ POR EL PANGOLÍN?

  • Rechaza cualquier producto que provenga de este animal, ya sea carne, escamas o productos “milagro” para la cura de enfermedades. Lee bien las etiquetas de posibles remedios tradicionales, especialmente si son originarias del mercado asiático, y recuerda que sus hipotéticos beneficios no tienen ninguna base científica, por lo que te puedes replantear su uso.
  • Comparte información: si posees datos nuevos sobre pangolines, fotos o vídeos, contacta con el PangolinSG para colaborar con la investigación. Habla sobre él en tu entorno cercano para concienciar y dar a conocer este fantástico animal único.
  • Haz un doctorado sobre el pangolín. Todavía es necesaria gran cantidad de investigación sobre estas especies, así que si eres estudiante y piensas hacer un doctorado, puedes colaborar con el PangolinSG con tus futuras investigaciones.
  • Hazte voluntario del PangolinSG. Involúcrate en el desarrollo e implementación de proyectos y programas de conservación.
  • Haz una donación económica para que el PangolinSG pueda continuar su labor.

En conclusión, se necesita más investigación científica, un cambio de mentalidad y políticas de protección para evitar que el pangolín se convierta en un ejemplo más de especie extinguida a manos de la nuestra, como le está a punto de suceder al rinoceronte blanco.

REFERENCIAS

Mireia Querol Rovira