Arxiu d'etiquetes: metabiosis

Symbiosis: relationships between living beings

Predation, parasitism, competition… all living beings, besides interacting with the environment, we relate to other living beings. What types of relationships in addition to those you know? Do you feel like to know them?

INTRODUCTION

The group of all living beings in an ecosystem is called biocenosis or community. The biocenosis is formed in turn by different populations, which would be the set of individuals of the same species occupying an area. For survival, it is imperative that relations between them are established, sometimes beneficial and sometimes harmful.

INTERESPECIFIC RELATIONSHIPS

They are those that occur between individuals of different species. This interaction it is called symbiosis. Symbiotic relationships can be beneficial to a species, both, or harmful to one of the two.

Detrimental to all the species involved:

Competition: occurs when one or more resources are limiting (food, land, light, soil …). This relationship is very important in evolution, as it allows natural selection acts by promoting the survival and reproduction of the most successful species according to their physiology, behavior …

Las selvas son un claro ejemplo de competencia de los vegetales en busca de la luz. Selva de Kuranda, Australia. Foto de Mireia Querol
Rainforests are a clear example of competition between vegetals in the search for light. Kuranda rainforest, Australia. Photo by Mireia Querol
One species has benefits and the other is detrimented:
  • Predation: occurs when one species (predator) feeds on another (prey). This is the case of cats, wolves, sharks
foca, león marino,
Great white shark (Carcharodon carcharias) jumping to depretade a marine mamal, maybe a sea lion. Photo taken from HQ images.
  • Parasitism: one species (parasite) lives at the expense of other (host) and causes it injury. Fleas, ticks, pathogenic bacteria are the best known, but there are also vertebrate parasites, like the cuckoo that lay their eggs in the nests of other birds, which will raise their chicks (brood parasitism). Especially interesting are the “zombie parasites”, which modify the behavior of the host. Read this post to learn more!
    Carricero (Acrocephalus scirpaceus) alimentando una cría de cuco (Cuculus canorus). Foto de Harald Olsen
    Reed warbler (Acrocephalus scirpaceus) feeding a cuckoo’s chick (Cuculus canorus). Photo by Harald Olsen

    Parasites that live inside the host’s body are called endoparasites (such as tapeworms), and those who live outside ectoparasites (lice). Parasitism is considered a special type of predation, where predator is smaller than prey, although in most cases does not cause the death of the host. When a parasite causes illness or death of the host, it is called pathogen.

    Cymothoa exigua es un parásito que acaba sustituyendo la lengua de los peces por su propio cuerpo. Foto de Marcello Di Francesco.
    Cymothoa exigua is a parasite that replaces the tongue of fish with their own body. Picture by Marcello Di Francesco.

Kleptoparasitism is stealing food that other species has caught, harvested or prepared. This is the case of some raptors, whose name literally means “thief.” See in this video a case of kleptoparasitism on an owl:


Kleptoparasitism can also occur between individuals of the same species.

One species has benefits and the other is not affected:
  • Commensalism: one species (commensal) uses the remains of food from another species, which does not benefit or harm. This is the case of bearded vultures. It is also commensalism the use as transportation from one species over another (phoresy), as barnacles attached to the body of whales. The inquilinism is a type of commensalism in which a species lives in or on another. This would apply to the woodpeckers and squirrels that nest in trees or barnacles living above mussels. Finally, metabiosis is the use of the remains of a species for protection (like hermit crabs) or to use them as tools.
    El pinzón carpintero (Camarhynchus pallidus) utiliza espinas de cactus o pequeñas ramas para extraer invertebrados de los árboles. Foto de
    The woodpecker finch (Camarhynchus pallidus) uses cactus spines or small branches to remove invertebrates from the trees. Picture by Dusan Brinkhuizen.
    Both species have benefits:
  • Mutualism: the two species cooperate or are benefited. This is the case of pollinating insects, which get nectar from the flower and the plant is pollinated. Clownfish and anemones would be another typical example, where clown fish gets protection and food scraps while keeps predators away and clean parasites of the sea anemonae. Mutualism can be optional (a species do not need each other to survive) or forced (the species can not live separately). This is the case of mycorrhizae, an association of fungi and roots of certain plants, lichens (mutualism of fungus and algae), leafcutter ants

    Las hormigas Atta y Acromyrmex (hormigas cortadoras de hogas) establecen mutualismo con un hongo (Leucocoprinus gongylophorus), en las que recolectan hojas para proporcionarle nutrientes, y ellas se alimentan de él. Se trata de un mutualismo obligado. Foto tomada de Ants kalytta.
    Atta and Acromyrmex ants (leafcutter ants) establish mutualism with a fungus (Leucocoprinus gongylophorus), in which they gather leaves to provide nutrients to the fungus, and they feed on it. It is an obligate mutualism. Photo taken from Ants kalytta.

INTRAESPECIFIC RELATIONSHIPS

They are those that occur between individuals of the same species. They are most beneficial or collaborative:

  • Familiars: grouped individuals have some sort of relationship. Some examples of species we have discussed in the blog are elephants, some primates, many birds, cetaceans In such relationships there are different types of families.
  • Gregariousness: groups are usually of many unrelated individuals over a permanent period or seasonal time. The most typical examples would be the flocks of migratory birds, migration of the monarch butterfly, herds of large herbivores like wildebeest, shoal of fish

    El gregarismo de estas cebras, junto con su pelaje, les permite confundir a los depredadores. Foto tomada de Telegraph
    Gregariousness of these zebras, along with their fur, allow them to confuse predators. Photo taken from Telegraph
  • Colonies: groups of individuals that have been reproduced asexually and share common structures. The best known case is coral, which is sometimes referred to as the world’s largest living being (Australian Great Barrier Reef), but is actually a colony of polyps (and its calcareous skeletons), not single individual.
  • Society: they are individuals who live together in an organized and hierarchical manner, where there is a division of tasks and they are usually physically different from each other according to their function in society. Typical examples are social insects such as ants, bees, termites

Intraspecific relations of competition are:

  • Territorialityconfrontation or competition for access to the territory, light, females, food can cause direct clashes, as in the case of deer, and/or develop other strategies, such as marking odor (cats, bears), vocalization

    Tigres peleando por el territorio. Captura de vídeo de John Varty
    Tiger figthing for territory. Video caption by John Varty
  • Cannibalism: predation of one individual over another of the same species.

And you, as a human, have you ever thought how do you relate with individuals of your species and other species?

MIREIA QUEROL ALL YOU NEED IS BIOLOGY

REFERENCES

La simbiosis: relaciones entre los seres vivos

Depredación, parasitismo, competencia… todos los seres vivos, además de relacionarnos con el medio, nos relacionamos con el resto de seres vivos. ¿Qué tipos de relaciones conoces además de las mencionadas? ¿Te animas a conocerlas?

INTRODUCCIÓN

El conjunto de seres vivos de un ecosistema se llama biocenosis o comunidad. La biocenosis está formada a su vez por distintas poblaciones, que serían el conjunto de individuos de una misma especie que ocupan un área determinada. Para la supervivencia, es imprescindible que se establezcan relaciones entre ellos, a veces beneficiosas y a veces perjudiciales.

RELACIONES INTERESPECÍFICAS

Son las que se dan entre individuos de distintas especies. A esta interacción se la llama simbiosis. Las relaciones de simbiosis puede ser beneficiosas para una especie, ambas, o perjudiciales para una de las dos partes.

Perjudiciales para todas las especies implicadas:
  • Competencia: se da cuando uno o varios recursos son limitantes (alimento, territorio, luz, suelo…). Esta relación es muy importante en la evolución, ya que permite que la selección natural actúe, favoreciendo la supervivencia y reproducción de las especies más exitosas según su fisiología, comportamiento…

    Las selvas son un claro ejemplo de competencia de los vegetales en busca de la luz. Selva de Kuranda, Australia. Foto de Mireia Querol
    Las selvas son un claro ejemplo de competencia de los vegetales en busca de la luz. Selva de Kuranda, Australia. Foto de Mireia Querol
Una especie se beneficia y otra es perjudicada:
  • Depredación: ocurre cuando una especie (depredador) se alimenta de otra (presa). Es el caso de los felinos, lobos, tiburones

    foca, león marino, tiburón blanco, great white shark, tauró blanc, foca, lleó marí, seal
    Tiburón blanco (Carcharodon carcharias) saltando para depredar sobre un mamífero marino, presumiblemente una foca o león marino. Foto tomada de HQ images.
  • Parasitismo: una especie (parásito) vive a costa de otra (huésped) y le causa un perjuicio. Pulgas, garrapatas, bacterias patógenas… son las más conocidas, pero también hay vertebrados parásitos como el cuco, que disposita sus huevos en nidos de otras aves, que criarán sus pollos (parasitismo de puesta). . Especialmente interesantes son los “parásitos zombie”, que modifican la conducta del huésped. ¡Entra en este artículo para saber más!
    Carricero (Acrocephalus scirpaceus) alimentando una cría de cuco (Cuculus canorus). Foto de Harald Olsen
    Carricero (Acrocephalus scirpaceus) alimentando una cría de cuco (Cuculus canorus). Foto de Harald Olsen

    Los parásitos que habitan dentro del cuerpo del huésped se llaman endoparásitos (como la tenia), y los que habitan fuera ectoparásitos (piojos). El parasitismo se considera un tipo especial de depredación, donde el depredador es más pequeño que la presa, aunque en la mayoría de casos no supone la muerte del huésped. Cuando un parásito causa enfermedad o la muerte del huésped, se denomina patógeno.

    Cymothoa exigua es un parásito que acaba sustituyendo la lengua de los peces por su propio cuerpo. Foto de Marcello Di Francesco.
    Cymothoa exigua es un parásito que acaba sustituyendo la lengua de los peces por su propio cuerpo. Foto de Marcello Di Francesco.

El cleptoparasitimo es el robo del alimento a otra especie que lo ha capturado, recolectado o preparado. Es el caso de algunas rapaces, cuyo nombre significa literalmente “ladrón”. Observa en este vídeo un caso de cleptoparasitismo sobre una lechuza:

El cleptoparasitismo también puede darse entre individuos de la misma especie.

Una especie se beneficia y la otra no se ve afectada:
  • Comensalismo: una especie (comensal) aprovecha los restos de alimento de otra especie, a la que no beneficia ni perjudica. Seria el caso de los buitres leonados o quebrantahuesos. También es comensalismo el aprovechamiento como medio de transporte de una especie sobre otra (foresis), como las lapas que viajan pegadas al cuerpo de las ballenas. El inquilinismo es un tipo de comensalismo en el que una especie vive dentro o encima de otra. Sería el caso de los pájaros carpinteros o ardillas que anidan dentro de los árboles o las bellotas de mar que viven encima del mejillón. Por último, la metabiosis o tanatocresia es el aprovechamiento de los restos de una especie para protegerse (com los cangrejos ermitaños) o usarlos como herramientas.
    El pinzón carpintero (Camarhynchus pallidus) utiliza espinas de cactus o pequeñas ramas para extraer invertebrados de los árboles. Foto de
    El pinzón carpintero (Camarhynchus pallidus) utiliza espinas de cactus o pequeñas ramas para extraer invertebrados de los árboles. Foto de Dusan Brinkhuizen.
    Ambas especies se ven beneficiadas:
  • Mutualismo: las dos especies cooperan o se ven beneficiadas. Es el caso de los insectos polinizadores, que obtienen néctar de la flor y el vegetal es polinizado. Los peces payaso y las anémonas serían otro ejemplo típico, donde el pez payaso obtiene protección y sobras de comida y mantiene alejados a los depredadores de la anémona y la limpia de parásitos. El mutualismo puede ser facultativo (una especie no necesita a la otra para sobrevivir) u obligado (las especies no pueden vivir de manera separada). Éste sería el caso de las micorrizas, asociación de hongos y raíces de ciertas plantas, los líquenes (mutualismo de hongo y alga) , las hormigas cortadoras de hojas…

    Las hormigas Atta y Acromyrmex (hormigas cortadoras de hogas) establecen mutualismo con un hongo (Leucocoprinus gongylophorus), en las que recolectan hojas para proporcionarle nutrientes, y ellas se alimentan de él. Se trata de un mutualismo obligado. Foto tomada de Ants kalytta.
    Las hormigas Atta y Acromyrmex (hormigas cortadoras de hojas) establecen mutualismo con un hongo (Leucocoprinus gongylophorus), en las que recolectan hojas para proporcionarle nutrientes, y ellas se alimentan de él. Se trata de un mutualismo obligado. Foto tomada de Ants kalytta.

RELACIONES INTRAESPECÍFICAS

Son las que se dan entre individuos de la misma especie. Son casi todas beneficiosas o de colaboración:

  • Familiares: los individuos que se agrupan tienen algún tipo de parentesco. Algunos ejemplos de especies que hemos tratado en el blog son los elefantes, algunos primates, muchas aves, cetáceos… Dentro de este tipo de relaciones hay distintos tipos de familias.
  • Gregarismo: son agrupaciones, habitualmente de muchos individuos con o sin parentesco durante un lapso de tiempo permanente o estacional. Los ejemplos más típicos serian las bandadas de aves migratorias, la migración de la mariposa monarca, las manadas de grandes herbívoros como los ñus, los bancos de peces

    El gregarismo de estas cebras, junto con su pelaje, les permite confundir a los depredadores. Foto tomada de Telegraph
    El gregarismo de estas cebras, junto con su pelaje, les permite confundir a los depredadores. Foto tomada de Telegraph
  • Colonias: agrupaciones de individuos que se han reproducido asexualmente y comparten estructuras comunes. El caso más conocido es el del coral, que a veces es mencionado como el ser vivo más grande del mundo (Gran Barrera de Coral Australiana), aunque en realidad se trata una colonia de pólipos (y sus antiguos esqueletos calcáreos), no un ser vivo individual.
  • Sociedades: son individuos que viven juntos de manera organizada y jerarquizada, donde hay un reparto de las tareas y habitualmente son físicamente distintos entre ellos según su función dentro de la sociedad. Los ejemplos típicos son los insectos sociales como las hormigas, abejas, termitas…

Las relaciones intraespecíficas de competencia son:

  • Territorialidad: se define por enfrentamientos o competencia por acceso al territorio, a la luz, a las hembras, al alimento… se pueden producir enfrenamientos directos, como en el caso de los ciervos, y/o desarrollar otras estrategias, como el marcaje por olor (felinos, osos…), vocalizaciones…

    Tigres peleando por el territorio. Captura de vídeo de John Varty
    Tigres peleando por el territorio. Captura de vídeo de John Varty
  • Canibalismo: depredación de un individuo sobre otro de la misma especie.

Y tú, como humano, ¿ has reflexionado alguna vez como te relacionas con los individuos de tu especie y de otras especies?

Mireia Querol Rovira

REFERENCIAS